OBJECTIVES AND TENETS OF THE COURSE:

The objective of this course is to prepare students for advanced English Language Communications activities. The course will equip students with the basic knowledge of Linguistic Pragmatics (with special focus on interactional Im/politeness) and will enable them to analyse audiovisual texts both in their original English versions and in their counterparts translated into Italian. As far as audiovisual translation is concerned, subtitling and dubbing are the translation modes which will receive more attention, especially from a pragmatic perspective, in order to identity and apprehend the function that pragmatic language features fulfill in audiovisual English dialogues, as well as the manipulations they undergo in dubbing and subtitling translation. To do so, authentic audiovisual material, in the form of video clips, will be used during classes and students are expected to develop a critical sense of the main features and functions of audiovisual dialogue in its original and translated form, always from a pragmatic perspective. English as a lingua franca will be briefly touched upon, in view of its relevance with globalization and the language of the media, in general. 

The course will cover the following areas: linguistic pragmatics, film dialogue and audiovisual translation, English language in the media, English as a lingua franca. Each area has its own reference texts listed in the dedicated section.


TEACHING MATERIAL AND TEACHING PLANNING:

Power point presentations represent the main source during classes, together with further readings indicated in the reference section. Power points facilitate students in the understanding of the contents of the academic readings, so attending classes is highly encouraged. Video clips will be used as a collaborative learning tool to study audiovisual dialogue and its translation into Italian. To attain this purpose, both subtitled and dubbed versions of the same English clip will be viewed to flesh out and discuss differences, existing between the two translation modes, in the way pragmatic features of the original dialogue are handled in audiovisual translation.


REFERENCE TEXTS:

Below are the areas covered by the course with their reference material, which is the same and obligatory for both attending and non-attending students:


PRAGMATICS AND POLITENESS:

-Eelen, G. 2001. A Critique of Politeness Theories. Manchester: St. Jerome Publishing. Pp: 1-29.

-Plag, I., Braun, M., Lappe, S., Schramm, M. 2000. Introduction to English Linguistics. Berlin: De Gruyter Mouton. Pp: 176-206.


THE LANGUAGE OF THE INTERNET:

-Crystal, D. 2006. Language and the Internet. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Pp: 26-52, 86-98.


THE LANGUAGE OF BROADCASTING MEDIA:

-O'Keeffe, A. 2006. Investigating Media Discourse. London/New York: Routledge. Pp: 1-10.

-Tolson, A. 2006. Media Talk. Spoken Discourse on TV and Radio. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press. Pp: 57-73.


THE LANGUAGE OF AUDIOVISUAL DIALOGUE AND OF AUDIOVISUAL TRANSLATION:

-Diaz-Cintas (Ed.). 2009. New Trends in Audiovisual Translation. 2009. Buffalo/Bristol/Toronto: Multilingual Matters. Pp:1-12, 44-57, 58-69, 197-209.

-Freddi, M. and Pavesi, M. 2009. Analysing Audiovisual Dialogue: Linguistic and Translational Insights. Bologna: CLUEB. Pp: 19-30.

-Guillot, M.N. 2010. Film Subtitles from a Cross-Pragmatics Perspective. The Translator, 16(1). Pp: 67-92.

-Kozloff, S. 2000. Overhearing Film Dialogue. Pp: 14-26.


FINAL ASSESSMENT:

Students must first pass a written exam held by prof. Elphinstone which consists in an "elaborato" of the length of 3 to 6 pages where students are expected to choose and compare two media texts, among the following types: newspaper articles, magazine front covers, advertisements, pages from similar websites, analogous scenes from similar films or TV series. Once completed the written exam, students will take the oral exam with prof. Napoli and the final mark will be the average of the two marks. Students will NOT need to pass the written exam to access the oral part, unless they refuse the written mark.